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Esoteric Ramblings [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Ben

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The Humanist Manifesto, II [Feb. 28th, 2015|09:32 am]
Ben
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humanist_Manifesto_II

There seems to no element of this which is not worth embracing-- More details here:

http://americanhumanist.org/Humanism/Humanist_Manifesto_II

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(no subject) [Feb. 23rd, 2015|01:43 am]
Ben
"What is powerful about Bell's theorem is that it doesn't refer to any particular physical theory. It shows that nature violates the most general Assumptions behind classical pictures, not just details of some particular models. No combination of local deterministic and local random variables can reproduce the phenomena predicted by quantum mechanics and repeatedly observed in experiments."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell%27s_theorem
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(no subject) [Jan. 21st, 2015|09:27 pm]
Ben
[Tags|]

It's always fun to compare articles between languages (or search for knowledge in other languages) and see where and why points of difference arise. Here's a fun example, one that goes in the public water of a majority of Americans (but not my well water):

The English article is quite sparse, talks about use for water fluoridation... You'll notice the hazard indicators aren't very extreme.

wikipedia-en_sodiumfluorosilicate

Then, we have the German article, translated via google:

wikipedia-de-en_sodiumfluorosilicate

"gelling agent, opacifier, insecticide and rodenticide, synthetic cryolite production, beryllium..." All sorts of pretty clear warnings about toxicity, reactivity.

I'm glad it isn't in my water. So is most of the non-English speaking world. Really makes you wonder...
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(no subject) [Dec. 17th, 2014|12:19 pm]
Ben

Self-knowledge is always hard won, and in my experience nobody acquires much unless circumstances force it; the process is simply too painful. Having entered into a condition of pain — and if you do not think this nation is in pain, please explain in the comment box — we can face the truths that practically drown us now and alter course decisively. This is our opportunity.

http://www.salon.com/2014/12/17/we_are_fing_sadists_we_are_not_decent_and_we_are_not_a_democracy/

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WTF, Google? [Dec. 14th, 2014|09:19 am]
Ben


Okay, yes, that sounds like something we all need to explore in depth, so that all involved are sent to a credible institute of justice. Probably the Hague's ICC.

*CLICK*





... so much for journalism? I don't understand, how do we move from "12,011 more" to "no articles related?"

Magic?
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Essay: Anatomy of the Deep State [Dec. 13th, 2014|11:01 am]
Ben
There is the visible government situated around the Mall in Washington, and then there is another, more shadowy, more indefinable government that is not explained in Civics 101 or observable to tourists at the White House or the Capitol. The former is traditional Washington partisan politics: the tip of the iceberg that a public watching C-SPAN sees daily and which is theoretically controllable via elections. The subsurface part of the iceberg I shall call the Deep State, which operates according to its own compass heading regardless of who is formally in power.

During the last five years, the news media has been flooded with pundits decrying the broken politics of Washington. The conventional wisdom has it that partisan gridlock and dysfunction have become the new normal. That is certainly the case, and I have been among the harshest critics of this development. But it is also imperative to acknowledge the limits of this critique as it applies to the American governmental system. On one level, the critique is self-evident: In the domain that the public can see, Congress is hopelessly deadlocked in the worst manner since the 1850s, the violently rancorous decade preceding the Civil War...

Yes, there is another government concealed behind the one that is visible at either end of Pennsylvania Avenue, a hybrid entity of public and private institutions ruling the country according to consistent patterns in season and out, connected to, but only intermittently controlled by, the visible state whose leaders we choose. My analysis of this phenomenon is not an exposé of a secret, conspiratorial cabal; the state within a state is hiding mostly in plain sight, and its operators mainly act in the light of day. Nor can this other government be accurately termed an “establishment.” All complex societies have an establishment, a social network committed to its own enrichment and perpetuation. In terms of its scope, financial resources and sheer global reach, the American hybrid state, the Deep State, is in a class by itself. That said, it is neither omniscient nor invincible. The institution is not so much sinister (although it has highly sinister aspects) as it is relentlessly well entrenched. Far from being invincible, its failures, such as those in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya, are routine enough that it is only the Deep State’s protectiveness towards its higher-ranking personnel that allows them to escape the consequences of their frequent ineptitude.


-- http://billmoyers.com/2014/02/21/anatomy-of-the-deep-state/
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(no subject) [Dec. 8th, 2014|02:14 pm]
Ben
"...the fundamental bankruptcy of a liberal cast of mind that holds that enlightenment on social issues is the defining feature of modern liberalism; economic injustices and inequities are secondary or tertiary concerns, if they are concerns at all. This liberalism — more precisely, neoliberalism — makes its peace with the plutocracy."

http://www.salon.com/2014/12/08/chris_hughes_morally_bankrupt_liberalism_the_facebook_prince_shows_his_true_colors/

This is actually somewhat topical to me, as I am (was?) close to someone who has adopted exactly this mindset, perhaps because they work directly for one of the US's bigger plutocrats.

One of the side effects of this gradual erosion of civic life and social/political norms has been this sense in which the system very gently set people into conventional situations and gradually turned up the heat until lines painted in bright red by our progressive forebears were crossed. I've yet to hear a shred of rhetoric convincingly justify any political/legal/economic injustice we've witnessed. A blind faith that this is the only "real world," was the only defense one friend could give, worse still acknowledging injustices and taking the position of explicit complicity. Such people risk becoming destructive forces in society. By individually styling these things legitimized, they float the boats of tyrants, tycoons, plutocrats, and fascists.
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electioneering [Nov. 5th, 2014|01:42 am]
Ben
Colorado just had its future stolen from it in this "democratic" election. I mourn for everything we've lost and will lose, starting with Udall, one of two guys in the US Senate opposing an US Executive Branch that has gone completely off the rails with extralegal self-entitlement to unchecked "executive priviledge."

Beyond that, Gardner is a motherfucker and a troglodyte, politically.

Machiavellian US "Democracy" fascade is failing or non-existing in parts.
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memories for sale [Sep. 5th, 2014|04:42 pm]
Ben
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(no subject) [Aug. 15th, 2014|12:19 pm]
Ben
Kinda bummed my local friends went to a local fandom convention; had I known anyone was going, I'd've gone. Because I didn't think anyone I knew would be there, I didn't make plans. As usual, they find ways to exclude me and make me feel worthless. After ten years of this bullshit since I moved to Colorado, I can only conclude: they are truely masters of their craft.
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